Stainless steel is the generic name for a number of different steels used primarily because of their corrosion resistance. All stainless steels share a minimum percentage of 10.5% chromium. It is this element that reacts with the oxygen in the air to form a complex chrome-oxide surface layer that is invisible but strong enough to prevent further oxygen from staining (rusting) the surface.

The layer itself is extremely thin is described as passive (does not react or influence other materials), tenacious (clings to the layer of steel and is not transferred elsewhere) and self-renewing (if damaged, more chromium from the steel will be exposed to the air and form more chromium oxide).

This means that over a period of years a stainless-steel knife can literally be worn away by daily use and will remain stainless. Higher levels of chromium and the addition of other alloying elements such as nickel and molybdenum enhance this surface layer and improve the corrosion resistance of the stainless material.